Bart Koopman

Bart Koopman

Patients with various diseases commonly acquire acute kidney injury. Acute kidney injury confers a high risk of irreversible chronic injury to kidneys and other organs. Nonetheless, we can determine acute kidney injury using only two unreliable measures in blood and urine. Reliable measures in blood or urine are essential for predicting and diagnosing acute kidney injury timely and accurately. Moreover, reliable measures may help choose among different therapies for acute kidney injury. After his doctorate research, during his training to become a specialist in internal medicine, Bart is studying a specific cause of acute kidney injury. With the support of the Niels Stensen Fellowship, he will join the quest for reliable measures for predicting and diagnosing acute kidney injury at the Division of Renal Medicine at Harvard University

Michael Klenk

Michael Klenk

During his time as a PhD candidate, Michael was a visiting fellow at Oxford University, Columbia University, and Harvard University. He has taught courses on metaethics, logic, and metaphysics, chaired the PhD Council of the Dutch Research School of Philosophy for two years, and (co-)organised several academic conferences. Michael’s research interests lie at the intersection of epistemology, metaethics, and moral psychology, and he presented on these topics at more than twenty conferences in places such as Athens, Bogota, Cambridge, MA, Munich, St. Andrews, and Oxford. Since completing his PhD, he is working as a lecturer in ethics and philosophy of technology at Delft University of Technology. As a Niels Stensen fellow he aims toat studying the ethical consequences of social media use and the attention-based business model under which social media operates. What does social media imply for the freedom of the will of its users? What are the dynamics of the attention economy? And what are appropriate legislative reactions?

Michael Lerch

Michael Lerch

Nature produces a myriad of materials that respond to changes in the environment; think, for example, of pine cones, bones, leaves and wood. Scientists draw inspiration from nature to create smart synthetic materials with previously unseen properties and functionalities. Such materials have wide-ranging potential applications for building purposes, self-cleaning surfaces, transport and self-regulating materials.

As a Niels Stensen fellow, Michael will move to Harvard University to work on light-controlled bio-inspired materials. He will combine his background in synthetic chemistry and photochemistry with engineering and the understanding of nature’s materials. Insights gained in this project will be applicable to for example optical instruments and microfluidic parts of diagnostic devices.

 

Vestert Borger

Vestert Borger

In the development of the European Union’s constitution, the authority of law has been crucial, and with it the authority of the Court of Justice. Recently, however, the Court’s authority has met with fresh political authority arising from the urgency of the euro crisis. When the Court had to rule on the legality of assistance to financially distressed states like Greece – essential for the survival of the currency union – it seemed to have no option but to condone political decisions already made. Such limits to the Court’s authority as a matter of fact raise an important question for European legal scholarship: to what extent are they, or should they be, also limits as a matter of law? Drawing on a comparison with the American constitutional system, this research seeks to discover limits, if any, to the authority of the European judge. The project will be hosted by Yale Law School, starting on 1 September 2019.

Lisa Kattenberg

Lisa Kattenberg

What did the Dutch Republic and the native Mapuche clans of south Chile have in common during the seventeenth century? A common enemy, to begin with. This project re-evaluates the Dutch Revolt in the global context of the Spanish empire by investigating the connections between the Dutch Revolt and the Chilean Arauco War, both real and imagined. By teasing out the triangle of Dutch, (colonial) Spanish and Mapuche interactions, both on an intellectual and a practical level, this project aims to further develop our understanding of the significance of Dutch history in the making of the modern world. After obtaining her PhD (cum laude) in July 2018, Lisa became lecturer in early modern history at the University of Amsterdam. As a Niels Stensen fellow she will visit the University of Cambridge, starting August 2019.