Bart Koopman

Bart Koopman

Patients with various diseases commonly acquire acute kidney injury. Acute kidney injury confers a high risk of irreversible chronic injury to kidneys and other organs. Nonetheless, we can determine acute kidney injury using only two unreliable measures in blood and urine. Reliable measures in blood or urine are essential for predicting and diagnosing acute kidney injury timely and accurately. Moreover, reliable measures may help choose among different therapies for acute kidney injury. After his doctorate research, during his training to become a specialist in internal medicine, Bart is studying a specific cause of acute kidney injury. With the support of the Niels Stensen Fellowship, he will join the quest for reliable measures for predicting and diagnosing acute kidney injury at the Division of Renal Medicine at Harvard University

Michael Klenk

Michael Klenk

During his time as a PhD candidate, Michael was a visiting fellow at Oxford University, Columbia University, and Harvard University. He has taught courses on metaethics, logic, and metaphysics, chaired the PhD Council of the Dutch Research School of Philosophy for two years, and (co-)organised several academic conferences. Michael’s research interests lie at the intersection of epistemology, metaethics, and moral psychology, and he presented on these topics at more than twenty conferences in places such as Athens, Bogota, Cambridge, MA, Munich, St. Andrews, and Oxford. Since completing his PhD, he is working as a lecturer in ethics and philosophy of technology at Delft University of Technology. As a Niels Stensen fellow he aims toat studying the ethical consequences of social media use and the attention-based business model under which social media operates. What does social media imply for the freedom of the will of its users? What are the dynamics of the attention economy? And what are appropriate legislative reactions?

Vestert Borger

Vestert Borger

In the development of the European Union’s constitution, the authority of law has been crucial, and with it the authority of the Court of Justice. Recently, however, the Court’s authority has met with fresh political authority arising from the urgency of the euro crisis. When the Court had to rule on the legality of assistance to financially distressed states like Greece – essential for the survival of the currency union – it seemed to have no option but to condone political decisions already made. Such limits to the Court’s authority as a matter of fact raise an important question for European legal scholarship: to what extent are they, or should they be, also limits as a matter of law? Drawing on a comparison with the American constitutional system, this research seeks to discover limits, if any, to the authority of the European judge. The project will be hosted by Yale Law School, starting on 1 September 2019.

Wouter Meijers

Wouter Meijers

New promising oncological therapies may result in fatal cardiovascular complications. Identifying those patients at risk is a high priority. Translational research will be needed to first better understand the pathophysiological mechanisms, second discover possible markers to better stratify patients who are at risk, and lastly to develop preventive strategies and/or treatment options. New discoveries derived from these experiments could directly be implemented in daily practice. The project will be hosted by Vanderbilt University, starting on 1 March 2019.